Artist of the Day- Terry Rose (click on image to view more)

I like this work. I needed to know how it was done. I really couldn't enjoy it till I had some of the methods figured out. Below is a quote from a website. Can't remember which one. There were many!

Terry Rose is a painter whose works are the product of both careful planning and chance. His latest and best-known works are made using a wet-on-wet technique developed after arduous experimentation. Rose coats a surface with wet varnish, then drops in oils, inks, mirror pigments, and enamels, and lets the pigments react with the liquid medium. The chemical reactions create the final image on the work, which appears to be a collection of colors bleeding, blurring, expanding, or sliding around the work’s surface.

Artist of the Day- Pentti Sammallahti (click on image to view more)

Pentti Sammallahti is a Finnish photographer born in 1950. His photos have a still, northern feel to them…big bulbous clouds in spare landscapes. He also includes animals…especially dogs but he documents them without sentimentality. He was given a 15 year grant by the Finnish government. Imagine! Try to imagine this country giving an artist a grant that would really make it possible to work all the time!  How valued would you feel. Like a MacArthur grant but for 15 years!

Artist of the Day- Stephen Gill (click on image to see more)

Working with a plastic camera was for Stephen Gill, a way to get away from photography…or start all over again. With a plastic camera, technique took a back seat while content became the driver. He hoped this way to have the element of chance become a player in his image making. While not denying the importance of the formal aspects of ‘picture making’ he set himself up to ‘see’ in a new way. The results are pretty amazing!!!

 

 

 

Artist of the Day- Lynette Yiadom-Boakye (click on image to see more)

She was born in London of Ghanaian descent in 1977. She went to art school in England but received little encouragement as she was working figuratively at a time when ‘the young British artists’ were producing shocking, sensational works using materials that were new to art…blood, cows cut in half, sharks in formaldehyde and elephant dung.

The beautiful people in Yiadom-Boakye’s paintings give no cultural hints. They’re not from anywhere. There is no political point evident. There are no hints in the settings. They are not portraits of people. They are fabricated from her imagination. There’s a big article about Yiadorn-Boakye in the current New Yorker if you want to read more.

Artist of the Day- Lynn Chadwick (click on image to see more)

Lynn Chadwick is a well known British artist.I love what he says about his process. It seems really honest and direct.

“I have never really been attracted towards clay as a material to work with because it’s too nebulous to me and it’s too soft. I can’t think of any shape that clay ought to be, I mean it can be any shape therefore I don’t know what to do with it. Whereas , if I make my constructions which are made out of iron and straight lines, I can do a drawing, a three-dimensional drawing, in this material, which has a very definite shape” Lynn Chadwick, British Library National Sound Archive, 1995.

 

Lynn Chadwick is a well known British artist.I love what he says about his process. It seems really honest and direct.

“I have never really been attracted towards clay as a material to work with because it’s too nebulous to me and it’s too soft. I can’t think of any shape that clay ought to be, I mean it can be any shape therefore I don’t know what to do with it. Whereas , if I make my constructions which are made out of iron and straight lines, I can do a drawing, a three-dimensional drawing, in this material, which has a very definite shape” Lynn Chadwick, British Library National Sound Archive, 1995.

 

 

Artist of the Day- Rosy Keyser (click on image to see more)

A title…Mnemonic Land Device, (For Blind Willie McTell), 2013- cardboard, palm mat, enamel, wire and steel
Here’s a quote from a gallery person…Matthew Day Jackson…Keyser“forces me to consider the history of abstraction, the idea of gesture, and finally a conversation of decay through creating a palimpsest,” he adds. “The level of inventiveness and playfulness in her work is startling as it feels more like a struggle of life and death. The work is deeply romantic, and lacks any notion of frivolity. Her intensity is one with which I have to reckon.” Really? All that from these loosely constructed, patchwork pieces? I like the work, though I can’t quite say why. I like corrugated materials. I like mixed media.I like grids. I like that title! Blind Willie McTell was a musician and wrote music in Braille...played Piedmont style!

 

 

Artist of the Day- Frank Stella (click on image to view more)

Frank Stella was born in Malden, Mass. He attended Philips Andover and then Princeton where he majored in History. ‘He is heralded for creating abstract paintings that bear no pictorial illusions or psychological or metaphysical references in twentieth-century painting. ‘ I have enjoyed watching the changes in his work over the years and have tried to give some reference to that in these images. The most recent works are shown first.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artist of the Day- Hans Hoffmann (click on image to view more)

‘His impact as a teacher is still palpable today, as his theories of the ”push and pull” of color and of breaking up the picture plane are still being disseminated by art teachers all over the world.’

I do admire Hoffmann. I think he was a tremendous influence on many, many young artists. I think he loved teaching. I don’t love his work. While brightly colored, to me it’s just all on the surface. I feel that once I’ve looked at a painting briefly, I’m done. I get it. Move on. I’m sure there’s something I’m missing…something I don’t get. Through my research I discovered that I much preferred his later works to the mid career ones.

 

 

Artist of the Day- Evan Crankshaw (click on image to see more)

My drawings tend to employ dichotomous, conflicting stratagies; abstraction and representation, distortion and precision, accuracy and sloppiness, non complementary marks…The life which emerges from the line is born of the roving eye, rather than the thing represented.

 These drawings with their hard lines that dissolve into soft passages are pretty interesting. In places they are identifiable…a box, the leg of a chair... which then serves to make the other parts that much more bizarre. Crankshaw will be leading a 5 day workshop at North Country Studio Workshops at Bennington College in January 2018. Go to the website to sign up!

http://ncsw.org/workshops

Artist of the Day - Kate Emlin (click on image to view more)

Emlin lives in Norwich, Vermont and spends time in Maine. She graduated from Kirkland College in NY and has a graduate degree from Yale. She spent 20 years working in graphic design and gradually moved to painting as the graphic design world became digitalized. Going back and forth between plein air sketching and development in the studio, her love of mark-making and her enjoyment of the paint, create a rhythm which invites an emotional engagement with the elements.  Her work reflects the way she both sees and intuits her surroundings.

Artist of the Day- Sophie Cape (click on image to view more)

Sophie Cape was an Olympic athlete till an injury curtailed her career.

She went to art school and says that making art is something like winning a race. There is that blank space where you can’t account for the success…it seems to have sprung from the air.

There are moments when I look at a particular painting and think…I did that? It’s like magic. It’s what keeps you going.